Spring Time and Sensitive Skin

The spring months are officially here! As the temperatures slowly begin to rise and we start to say goodbye to the cold winter days, our skin can often react to the change in weather - especially for those who have a skin condition.[1] Sensitive skin conditions can be due to eczema, psoriasis or dermatitis, and isn’t one condition itself. These conditions can result in uncomfortable symptoms associated with sensitive skin, such as itching, redness and flaking.[2] Don’t let the change in season impact your sensitive skin condition - follow our simple steps to help keep your sensitive skin symptoms at bay:

  1. Work out what your triggers are so that you can help avoid exposure. People who have eczema, for example, tend to have an over-reactive immune system which can result in a flare-up when exposed to certain things ie. seasonal pollen, particular fabrics, fragrances etc.[3] Knowing these triggers can help to avoid a flare-up.
  2. Apply plenty of moisturiser to help your skin retain moisture. Our QV Skin Lotion is lightweight and moisturising - perfect for everyday relief during the spring/summer months! As with any paraffin-based product, remember to regularly change clothing and bedding impregnated with the product and keep away from naked flames as this is a fire risk.
  3. Help to protect sensitive skin from the sun’s harmful UV rays by applying a sunscreen on a daily basis. Our sister brand SunSense provides sunscreen for people with even the most sensitive skin, including SunSense Sensitive which contains no chemical absorbers, no added colour and provides SPFF50+ broad spectrum protection.
  4. Stay hydrated. Drinking plenty of water will help to provide moisture to your skin, especially as the weather gets warmer and you may find yourself sweating more. 

For more useful information and advice, visit our blog page on our website: http://www.qvskincare.co.uk/blogs/ Alternatively, follow us on our social media pages @QVSkincareUK.

[1] Better Health, Eczema (atopic dermatitis) (Internet) 2018 (cited 2019 March 26) Available from: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/eczema-atopic-dermatitis

[2]  Better Health, Eczema (atopic dermatitis) (Internet) 2018 (cited 2019 March 26) Available from: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/eczema-atopic-dermatitis

[3] National Eczema Association, Eczema Causes and Triggers (Internet) 2019 (cited 2019 March 8) Available from: https://nationaleczema.org/eczema/causes-and-triggers-of-eczema/